Civil engineering

This innovation removes deadly arsenic from India's water

Professor Joyashree Roy and project team member Sreeman Mypati tasting water from ECAR plant.

12/12/2018 The Better India - Everyday, tens of millions of people drink water that significantly increases their risk of cancer and other deadly diseases. UC Berkeley professor Ashok Gadgil amd Asian Institute of Technology's Joyashree Roy hope to fix that with an efficient and cost-effective system called Electrochemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) for removing arsenic contamination from drinking water.

Fire & water

Thumbnail of video: Fire & Water: Restoring natural fire to California's mountains

11/14/2018 Restoring natural fire regimes to California’s mountains could be a win-win-win: more water, improved biodiversity and a reduced risk of catastrophic fires.

Turning cars into robot traffic managers

Thumbnail of video: Alex Bayen introduces Flow

10/29/2018 - Berkeley transportation researchers are addressing the emerging era of smart vehicles with a project that uses machine learning to manage traffic where autonomous, semi-autonomous and manned vehicles share the road. They presented their project, called Flow, at the Conference on Robotic Learning.

Engineered sand zaps storm water pollutants

Discarded cup carried to storm drain by runoff water

8/30/2018 - Berkeley engineers have created a new way to remove contaminants from storm water using mineral-coated sand, potentially addressing the needs of water-stressed communities that are searching for ways to tap the abundant and yet underused source of fresh drinking water.

Surveying expert James Anderson dies at 92

James Anderson

8/30/2018 - Professor James Anderson, civil and environmental engineering faculty member for 25 years and an expert on the theory and practice of surveying, died on Aug. 23; he was 92.

NSF funds extreme events reconnaissance network

House and car destroyed by tornado in Texas. Photo by Volkan Yuksel / Wikimedia Commons

8/15/2018 PEER - The National Science Foundation has awarded a grant to the Structural Extreme Events Reconnaissance (StEER) Network, which aims to improve reporting and coordination by the natural hazards engineering community in the aftermath of earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes and other extreme events. UC Berkeley is one of StEER's three primary nodes.

A seismic change in predicting how earthquakes will shake tall buildings

Construction cranes on the Los Angeles skyline

6/28/2018 New York Times - "There are going to be large changes coming" in the calculation of risk faced by by tall buildings during a major West Coast earthquake, adjunct civil and environmental engineering professor Norman Abrahamson told a conference of earthquake engineers in Los Angeles.

Then & now

Mashup of photo of McLaughlin Hall and the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Building (date unknown) with photos of current students

6/1/2018 Over the past 150 years, Berkeley Engineering has created a legacy of innovation and public service.

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