Lydia Sohn, UC Berkeley professor of mechanical engineering

Berkeley engineers squeeze cells through microtubes to detect cancer

Research led by Lydia Sohn, professor of mechanical engineering, could greatly improve the speed and accuracy of cancer diagnosis by exploiting the different speeds with which cancerous and healthy cells move through micropores.

Berkeley engineers squeeze cells through microtubes to detect cancer

4/17/2018, by Wallace Ravven Over the course of her lifetime, a woman has a one in eight chance of developing breast cancer. With the past few decades’ advances in early detection and treatment, a diagnosis by no means forecasts defeat. The earlier the cancer is detected, the more likely bad luck can turn to good. New technology being developed by Berkeley engineers could dramatically...

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Eric Brewer and James Demmel

Berkeley engineers among new faculty elected to AAAS

4/18/2018 Berkeley Engineering faculty members Eric Brewer and James Demmel are among nine UC Berkeley researchers elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a society founded in 1780 to honor exceptional scholars, scientists, artists and innovators from around the world.

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Thin film converts heat from electronics into energy

4/16/2018 Nearly 70 percent of the energy produced in the United States is wasted as heat — from exhaust pipes, high-speed electronics and other sources. Now Berkeley engineers have developed a thin-film system that can produce energy from these waste sources at unprecedented levels.

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Diagram of how thin film device converts waste heat into energy
  • New esports space coming to Foothill

    4/20/2018 - Campus leaders are planning to convert a community room in the Foothill Residence Hall into a new facility dedicated to competitive student video game teams, ESPN reports.

  • More female computing grads challenge tech's bad bros

    4/16/2018 Mercury News - More and more women are getting computer science and electrical engineering degrees from Berkeley and Stanford, reversing a national trend. But the growing and heated debate over the technology industry’s male-dominated culture hasn’t escaped the attention of those female students, said EECS professor John DeNero.

  • Valleytronics discovery could extend limits of Moore’s Law

    4/16/2018 Berkeley Lab - New research from Berkeley Lab, co-led by materials science and engineering Ph.D. candidate Shuren Lin, finds useful new information-handling potential in tin sulfide, a candidate “valleytronics” transistor material that might one day enable chipmakers to pack more computing power onto microchips.

  • Thin film converts heat from electronics into energy

    4/16/2018 - Nearly 70 percent of the energy produced in the United States is wasted as heat — from exhaust pipes, high-speed electronics and other sources. Now Berkeley engineers have developed a thin-film system that can produce energy from these waste sources at unprecedented levels.

150 years of innovation

Berkeley Engineering 150As Berkeley Engineering celebrates a century and a half of making our mark on history, we're highlighting people with the pioneering spirit, creative energy and social responsibility that characterize the college. This week:  Claudia Ostertag and the future of concrete.

Claudia Ostertag

Calling all grads

Register now for the May 15 commencement ceremonies at the Greek Theatre.

Stellar faculty

Our faculty includes 74 members of the National Academy of Engineering