Repairing the brain after stroke: a biomaterials strategy

Tatiana Segura, Duke University

9/26/2018

12:00pm - 1:00pm

Location: 106, Stanley Hall

Stroke is the leading cause of disability due to the brain’s limited capacity to regenerate damaged tissue. After stroke, an increased inflammatory and immune response coupled with severely limited angiogenesis and neuronal growth results in a stroke cavity devoid of normal brain tissue. However, stroke also induces the formation of a pro-repair/plastic region in the area adjacent to the stroke core that commences in the weeks to days after stroke and subsides months after stroke. We propose that the delivery of pro-repair biomaterial scaffolds in synchronization with the endogenous pro-repair window will result in repair of the stroke cavity. This talk will focus on our current efforts to promote brain repair after stroke utilizing biomaterials.

Professor Tatiana Segura received her BS degree in Bioengineering from the University of California Berkeley and her doctorate in Chemical Engineering from Northwestern University. Her graduate work in designing and understanding non-viral gene delivery from hydrogel scaffolds was supervised by Prof. Lonnie Shea. She pursued post-doctoral training at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne under the guidance of Prof. Jeffrey Hubbell, where her focus was self-assembled polymer systems for gene and drug delivery. Professor Segura's Laboratory studies the use of materials for minimally invasive in situ tissue repair. On this topic, she has published over 70 peered reviewed publications. She has been recognized with the Outstanding Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy, the American Heart Association National Scientist Development Grant, and the CAREER award from National Science Foundation. She was Elected to the College of Fellows at the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineers (AIMBE) in 2017. She spent the first 11 years of her career at UCLA department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and has recently relocated to Duke University, where she holds appointments in Biomedical Engineering, Neurology and Dermatology.

  • Sponsor:

    Bioengineering (BioE)
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