Environment

This innovation removes deadly arsenic from India's water

Professor Joyashree Roy and project team member Sreeman Mypati tasting water from ECAR plant.

12/12/2018 The Better India - Everyday, tens of millions of people drink water that significantly increases their risk of cancer and other deadly diseases. UC Berkeley professor Ashok Gadgil amd Asian Institute of Technology's Joyashree Roy hope to fix that with an efficient and cost-effective system called Electrochemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) for removing arsenic contamination from drinking water.

Fire & water

Thumbnail of video: Fire & Water: Restoring natural fire to California's mountains

11/14/2018 Restoring natural fire regimes to California’s mountains could be a win-win-win: more water, improved biodiversity and a reduced risk of catastrophic fires.

Can the world change course on climate change?

Floating ice melting in the water

10/15/2018 - In an episode of the Knowledge‌‌@‌Wharton podcast, Berkeley professor of energy Daniel Kammen and Wharton's Brian Berkey discusses a new United Nations report warning that severe impacts of global warming are likely to occur by 2040.

Engineered sand zaps storm water pollutants

Discarded cup carried to storm drain by runoff water

8/30/2018 - Berkeley engineers have created a new way to remove contaminants from storm water using mineral-coated sand, potentially addressing the needs of water-stressed communities that are searching for ways to tap the abundant and yet underused source of fresh drinking water.

Algorithm provides early warning system for goundwater contamination

Aerial view of cleanup project at Savannah River Site

8/30/2018 Berkeley Lab - National laboratory researchers led by Berkeley Lab's Haruko Wainwright, a new associate adjunct professor of nuclear engineering at UC Berkeley, have developed a low-cost method for real-time monitoring of groundwater pollutants using commonly available sensors.

NSF funds extreme events reconnaissance network

House and car destroyed by tornado in Texas. Photo by Volkan Yuksel / Wikimedia Commons

8/15/2018 PEER - The National Science Foundation has awarded a grant to the Structural Extreme Events Reconnaissance (StEER) Network, which aims to improve reporting and coordination by the natural hazards engineering community in the aftermath of earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes and other extreme events. UC Berkeley is one of StEER's three primary nodes.

Redesigning wind power

Diagram of the parts of the new efficient wind turbine: Tower, blades, concentrator and camouflage

6/1/2018 Berkeley Engineering students have designed a wind turbine that is quiet, efficient and protects birds.

Dam scanning

Scans comparing the Hume Lake Dam before and after drainage

6/1/2018 CEE professor Robert Kayen used lidar technology to evaluate the health of the Hume Lake Dam.

Berkeley water engineer lands 2018 'Slammy'

Joseph Charbonnet and his Grad Slam presentation

5/4/2018 Graduate Division - At the UC-wide Grad Slam competition on May 3, environmental engineering doctoral student Joseph Charbonnet brought home the first-place ‘Slammy’ — and $9,000 in prize money — for his three-minute talk on using manganese-coated sand to capture, clean and re-use stormwater.

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